Norway Architecture

Norway Architecture

According to localcollegeexplorer, the Norwegian situation is in full and particular turmoil, aimed at making up for the delays associated with traditional isolation. As in the other Scandinavian countries, architecture has mostly focused on its own specificity: attention to the landscape context almost to osmosis, expressionist tendencies but on the side of R. Steiner, taste for the fabulistic narration of ancient peasant roots, use preferential of wood, culture of the house (understood as shelter, which basically requires the sub-Arctic climate) rather than of the city and, finally, neo-regionalism reconciled, rightly and wrongly, with the thousand branches of the modern, never without from a monolithic classic substrate.

However, there is no lack of original examples, of authentic relevance even in the laborious elaboration of a national lexicon still in the course of formation, such as the cultural center of Troms (1984), of J. Kristoffersen, the Nordic center of the Faeroe Islands (1983), of O. Steen, and the splendid museum in Flora (1985), in which the skilful use of local elements gives life to the overwhelming semantic re-foundation of ” poor ” minimalist materials.

The lively Norwegian landscape is however dominated by two ” historical ” protagonists: S. Fehn and NH Eggen, who with sensitivity and inspiration continue to operate in the wake of contemporary codes, maturing them. Twenty years after his first house, Fehn added, in 1985, the Sejersted Bødtker House ii, creating the usual, delicate landscape connections. An actor for over twenty-five years on the country’s construction scene, Eggen is incomprehensibly unknown abroad. A shy, pragmatic, capable but ” silent ” character, the architect, with his sixty or more buildings, has concretely participated in the transformation of a largely rural land. In addition to the thirty school buildings, Eggen designed the cultural center in Trondheim, a series of houses in Kautokeino and the organic car park, also in Trondheim.

To K. Lund and Norway Slaatto, former partners of Fehn, on the other hand, after the Bergen church in 1982, the new headquarters of the bank of Norway (1987) are due: by aiming “at contextuality within the pre-existing fabric” through “continuity and integration”, the architects seem, however, to fail. ‘target. The cube, massively perimeter, remains inert, while the facades are charged with an ambiguous classical order. Indeed, it has been said that classicism is present in Norway in subterranean but well-rooted ways; with the contribution of E. Norberg-Schulz it even turns into neo-Palladianism. There is no shortage of postmodernist variants such as the eye-catching Sheraton hotel (1985, Platou Arkitekter), which, not satisfied with the exuberance of the exteriors, conceals a sort of highly decorated square inside. The best result is provided by Jan & Jon (JG Digerud and J.

The other aspect of manner neoclassicism is represented by the imaginative matter which is linked to the theosophical expressionism of R. Steiner, to whom the small kindergarten in Bergen (1981-83), belonging to the Hus group, is dedicated. The free plan, the sinuous lines, almost touching the art nouveau, evoke stimulating unrealities thanks to the gay approach of the spaces to the morphology of the site. ” New Figurativity ” is the label that collects the disparate results of Scandinavian culture, often confused with late-modern ambitions. The pinnacle, the staved wood, the leaden roof thus characterize the railway station designed by A. Henriksen (1982) in Homlia (Oslo), whose height difference is resolved by a typically Nordic pavilion connected to a terraced structure. Frankly modern, the Soria Moria convention center in Oslo, by A. Telje, FAS Torp and K. Aasen (1983), fully confirms the qualities of its authors, who already manifested themselves very well in the Oslo police headquarters in 1978, where an eventful ribbon plate incorporates collective areas in the serpentine.

The addresses indicated are confirmed by the most recent production. Fehn remains the main reference on the Norwegian scene, which nevertheless recorded, in the three-year period 1990-93, a timid opening towards the ” internationality ” of the taste for ” light ” technologies and for the ” tendency to oblique ” ‘of deconstructivism. On the other hand, ” critical regionalism ” has been strengthened and developed theoretically, no longer understood as a static condition of local declinations, but as a reasoned factor whose vitality is subject to continuous revisions and updates: an ” anti-centrism ” whose key words are assimilation of external changes and reinterpretation according to one’s own figurative identity. Finally, a surprising increase in adhesions to the Steiner movement characterizes what can now be defined as the third pole of N’s philosophical-architectural culture: the plastic drafts inspired by Steiner’s theories certainly make the general instances of the trend their own, but re-proposing them in a specific context where, for example, the joyful expressiveness of chromatisms and stereometries has nothing more to do with contemporary Teutonic elaborations. You see the joyful expressiveness of chromatisms and stereometries has nothing more to do with contemporary Teutonic elaborations. You see the joyful expressiveness of chromatisms and stereometries has nothing more to do with contemporary Teutonic elaborations.

Norway Architecture