Netherlands Cinema

Netherlands Cinema

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the brothers A. and W. Mullens known as Albert-Frères, the first producers in the Netherlands, according to pharmacylib, flooded foreign markets with all kinds of short films, while the national market remained strangely poor in salt for at least fifteen years. In the 1920s the producer M. Binger dominated, who had his own international star in the actor L. Bouwmeester and who had obtained a prestigious success with the diptych Gloria transita (1918) and Gloria fatalis(1922) by J. Gildemeijerx. In the following decade, director J. Speyer’s “internal” dialectal cinema was occasionally reinvigorated by the introduction of foreign directors, while the greatest and most famous of national filmmakers, documentarian J. Ivens, after having founded the Film-Liga in 1927 and made in his homeland Zuiderzee (1933), he subsequently operated all over the world. In 1934, the Venice Film Festival, was awarded Waters death of G. Rutten; later internationally distinguished M. Franken (but in Java) with Il canto della risaia (1935), CAH Van der Linden and HM Josephson with Young hearts (1936), the brothers J. and M. de Haas with The ballad of a top hat (1937). After the war, another documentary maker, B. Haanstra, established himself, whose activity from Mirror of Holland (grand prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 1951) to Ape and Super-Ape (1973; Italian title, The living forest) received numerous awards. In the unsuccessful feature film Haanstra (Fanfara, 1958), we remember Ciske, muzzle of a mouse (1955) by the German W. Staudte and The village on the river (1958) by F. Rademakers. In the 1960s, the youth movement of the provos not only anticipated the European protest, but also favored a new cinema, albeit strongly influenced by foreign models. In addition to Rademakers (The Knife, 1960) Wim Verstappen and Pim de la Parra (sometimes in pairs), Ph. Bregstein (The compromise, 1968, Opera Prima prize at the Venice Film Festival), F. Weisz, A. Ditvoorst, N. Van der Heyde and, moving on to the seventies, P. Verhoeven (Il fiore di carne, 1973; The fourth man, 1973; Spetters, 1980) and J. Stelling (Mariken degli Inferni, 1975; Rembrandt fecit 1669, 1977). While the elderly van der Linden achieved the Oscar with the short film This Tiny World (1972), the personality of the militant filmmaker J. Van der Keuken asserted itself, both in the short film since 1964 and in the feature-length documentaries with The New Ice Age (1974).), Spring (1976), The Flat Jungle (1978), Towards the South (1981). The 1980s marked a time of good fortune for Dutch cinema. Alongside the international explosion of personalities such as Paul Verhoeven who successfully emigrated to the United States (accompanied, among other things, by two of his favorite actors, Jeroen Krabbe and Rutger Hauer), some works by directors such as Lilli Rademakers (Minuetto, 1980), Marga Kok (Opname, 1980), Marleen Gorris (The silence around Christine M., 1981; Broken mirrors, 1984), Mady Saks (Iris, 1987). The works of Dick Maas are commercial but of excellent quality (The lift, 1983; The Flodder arrive, 1987; Amsterdamned, 1989) which have achieved excellent takings. Also worth mentioning are the works of Orlow Seunke, who with The Taste of Water won the Lion for Best First Feature in Venice in 1982, a critical success repeated by the subsequent Pervola (1985), by Alex van Warmerdam (Abel, 1985, by Stelling (The Garden of Illusions, 1983; The Swinger, 1986) and by Rademakers who, with Assault, a war film about an episode linked to the Dutch resistance during the German occupation, won the Oscar for best foreign film in 1987. In the nineties, in addition to the new productions of Gorris (The tree of Antonia, 1996, Oscar for best foreign film), Maas (Do not disturb, 1999; Down, 2001), van Warmerdam (The dress, 1996; Little Tony, 1998) and Stelling (The Flying Dutchman, 1995), new talents such as R. de Heer (Bad Boy Bubby, 1993; Chloe’s Room, 1996), RJ Westdijk (Little Sister, 1995) and G. van Elst (Punk Lawyer, 1996). All the works focus on the unusual and cruel aspects of society, highlighting its metropolitan alienations. Also noteworthy is the debut of E. Lammers (Long life to the queen, 1995), a tribute to the world of fairy tales, which was followed by Tom & Thomas (2002) and above all that of M. van Diem who with Character (1998), based on a text by Ferdinand Bordewijk, obtained the Oscar for best foreign film. Important acknowledgments were finally attributed by critics to the works of D. Verbeek (Beat, 2004), M. Koolhoven (The South, 2004), to the documentary production of H. Hylkema (Johnny & Jones, 2001) as well as to the latest work by Van der Keuken (Extended holidays, 2000), one of the most important documentary makers of the last twenty years. In the Netherlands, the Netherlands Film Festival (in Utrecht) and the Rotterdam International Film Festival are held.

Netherlands Cinema