Brazil Cinema

Brazil Cinema

According to searchforpublicschools, at the beginning of the nineties, Brazilian cinema suffered a crisis due to the financial maneuver implemented by Fernando Collor de Mello to block the incipient inflation that led to the closure of production organizations such as Embrafilme and Concine and to an almost zeroing of film production in the country, whose domestic market was flooded with US productions. But a clear recovery began in the mid-1990s, also due to state incentives and tax relief mechanisms introduced by Lei do Audiovisual and Lei Rouanet, which together can cover up to 40% of the cost of a film. The combination of public and private capital has relaunched the film industry, whose production at the end of the nineties exceeded twenty titles a year. In Brazil, in the sixties and seventies, the aesthetics of Cinema novo, Tropicalisti and Cinema marginal (whose major exponents were Glauber Rocha and that Júlio Bressane still in splendid creative activity) was based on the visual expression of the combination of hunger and violence (with evident implications of social utopia) and on a visionary experimentalism. With the resumption of production, a new generation of directors, known as Nova Safra, on the one hand ideally reconnected to the ‘novista’ wave of the 1960s and 1970s (especially in the investigation of urban violence and in the exploration of the most miserable environments of the cities, the suburbs, the favelas and rural centers of the Northeast), on the other hand he has taken up the visionary ignitions, the poetic realism, the hallucinatory figuration that restore the cultural syncretism and visionarity of Brazil, thus managing to reconcile auteur cinema and spectacularity, visual values ​​and most popular codes.

Among the most important directors, Walter Salles, who had already enjoyed international success in the 1990s (with the Golden Bear won at the Berlin Film Festival and two Oscar nominations for Central do Brasil, 1998) and who was able to develop its own style capable of combining a spectacular sense with a narrative often based on the theme of travel and historical-social investigation, as in Abril despedaçado (2001; Desperato aprile), which transposes the plot of family revenge into Brazil of the early twentieth century of an Albanian novel by Ismail Kadaré (Prill i thyer, 1978; trad. it. April broken, 1993), and (before moving to Hollywood with the remake of a Japanese film, Dark water, 2005, and to shoot in France the adaptation of On the road by Jack Kerouac, 2012) in Diarios de motocicleta (2004; The motorcycle diaries), a successful work on the youth of Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara, and in Linha de passe (2008) co-directed with Daniela Thomas, a film of social denunciation set in the chorus of a chaotic San Paolo. Fernando Meirelles, on the other hand, made a name for himself with City of God (2002), a crude portrait of the favelas of Rio de Janeiro, between drug trafficking and scorched adolescence, shot in tandem with Kátia Lund, before dedicating himself to major international co-productions. A similar Hollywood fate (with the remake of RoboCop, 2014) that of José Padilha who, after his documentary debut, won the Golden Bear in Berlin with Tropa de elite (2007; Tropa de elite – The death squads), a very violent portrait of the ruthless methods and corruption of police patrolling the favelas of Rio (a sequel of which he shot in 2010). The theme of traveling on the road recurs in the films of Marcelo Gomes, Cinema, aspirinas eurubus (2005), Viajo porque precistitolo porque te amo (2009) and O homem das multidões (2013), by Edgar Allan Poe, and in Praia do future (2014) by Karim Aïnouz, who had shot in 2002 the portrait of irregular and volcanic sexuality by Joao Francisco dos Santos, aka Madame Satã, in the film of the same name. A murky homosexual relationship, interrupted by the arrival of a woman, is at the center of Cidade baixa (2005) by Sérgio Machado. The themes of metamorphosis, corporeality and sexuality, combined with refined experimentalisms and an almost metaphysical visionary character have characterized the work of Júlio Bressane, master of tropicalist marginal cinema (together with Rogério Sganzerla, Andrea Tonacci and Neville d’Almeida), who has developed and brought to a stylistic paroxysm and a refinement of cultural references, in order to give shape to a real cinematic but philosophical, in films such as Dias de Nietzsche em Turim (2001), Cleópatra (2007), A erva do rato (2008), O batuquedos astros (2012), Rua Aperana 52 (2012), Educação sentimental (2013). The anarchic and sentimental paths return in the films of a young student from Bressane, Bruno Safadi: Meu nome è Dindi (2007), Éden (2013), O ulivo da Gaita (2013), Love film festival (2014).

Brazil Cinema