Belgium Natural Divisions and Finance

Belgium Finance

The secular use consecrates, regardless of today’s administrative divisions, a division of Belgium into regions, some of which are truly distinguished by certain natural characteristics, while others have the sole reason for being traditional in ancient political divisions that have long since disappeared. Among these divisions there is first of all the region of the Ardenne, which does not correspond in its limits to any political or administrative border, indeed variously understood in the very use of the residents, extended in every way to the West even beyond the borders of the Belgian state: it is the high arid region of ancient lands, surrounded, as already mentioned, by the much more varied outcrops of limestone rocks. In S. delle Ardenne is the small village of Belgian Lorraine or lower Luxembourg, m.), for the more favorable exposure and climate, for the various and picturesque shapes due to the alternation of Jurassic limestones and marls. In N. delle Ardenne the Condroz stretches out almost in a long strip, a district of passage between the Ardennes and the deep groove of the Meuse, lower (200 m. On average) than the Ardennes plateau, broken by frequent valleys, not very fertile and still bitter and cold, – but varied and picturesque above all due to the frequent intermingling of limestones; del Condroz are an extension to the NE. the Pays de Herve between Meuse, Vesdre and the border, a sweet country full of prairies and verzieri, in the SW. l’Entre-Sambreet-Meuse, which introduces the Hainaut. The country crossed by the Sambre is precisely the Hainaut, which also extends beyond the border to a strip of French country: in the southern part it still touches the Ardennes with the ungrateful area of ​​the Fagnes, while in the part between Sambre and Schelda, lower and more united, it is one of the liveliest towns in Belgium for the combination of agricultural, mining and industrial wealth. NE. del Hainaut (to the East. of Brabant, to the West of Liège), between the Meuse and the Demer, stretches out in soft undulations at altitudes that still reach 200 m. the very fertile agricultural land resulting from the yellowish silt, up to 20 m thick, of the Hesbaye. To the west of the Hesbaye and limited to E. from the Geete and to the west from the Dendre (Dender) is the Brabant, central district of Belgium, low and flat in the northern part run by the transversal gutter of the Demer-Rupel, higher and moved to S . and here and there markedly engraved by the parallel river furrows of the Dendre, Senne, Dyle, all tributaries to the same gutter. With a distinctly distinct character, it extends to N. della Demer, passing through the nearby Dutch territory, the ingrata Campine, a relatively high strip of terraced plain, the remainder, as we have already said, of a pre-Quaternary delta deposit of Meuse and Rhine. Flanders is finally the whole town between the Dendre and the sea, extended even to the West right into the French borders: very fertile land by nature and by human art, from the lands along the Schelde to the lowlands of the polders, which, protected by dams, crossed by roads raised, bare of trees, they huddle behind the line of the coastal dunes. That part of Flanders which finally extends downstream from Ghent between the left bank of the Scheldt and the Dutch border is the so-called Pays de Waes. bare of trees, they huddle behind the line of the coastal dunes. That part of Flanders which finally extends downstream of Ghent between the left bank of the Scheldt and the Dutch border is the so-called Pays de Waes. bare of trees, they huddle behind the line of the coastal dunes. That part of Flanders which finally extends downstream of Ghent between the left bank of the Scheldt and the Dutch border is the so-called Pays de Waes. For Belgium 1997, please check aristmarketing.com.

Finances. – Given the predominantly industrial character and the high degree of dependence on foreign countries of the Belgian economy, the country’s financial events in the last decade have been characterized by an alternating movement of stasis and monetary tension. The deficit policy in the state budget, also connected to the public financing of investments in the national territory and in the Belgian Congo, and the movements of capital to and from abroad were also autonomous factors of monetary imbalance.

The central bank’s action to counter the excessive development of domestic means of payment and to safeguard the country’s currency position has resulted in frequent changes in banks’ reserve margins and in the official discount rate, in order to level off the interest rates compared to those prevailing abroad. Through the Fonds de Rente it was possible to restore a more active policy in order to regulate the offer of funds through the purchase and sale of public securities on the open market; and this with the direct intervention of the central bank in favor of the operations of the Fund.

Following the general devaluation of 1949, the official parity of the Belgian franc, declared to the International Monetary Fund, was fixed at 50 francs. b. for 1 US dollar on the basis of this parity, the gold content of the franc was defined in 1957 as 19.75 milligrams of fine gold. According to the new monetary statute approved on April 12, 1957, the right to change the gold content of the franc was reserved to Parliament, after the suspension which had been approved in 1944. A similar derogation was then made for the central bank regarding the obligation to cover its obligations on demand. With the new provisions, this obligation was reintroduced, and the gold coverage was set at one third of these commitments.

Belgium Finance